Physics Events

  • Monday, October 21, 2019
    Gravity Initiative Lunch
    “High Energy Collisions of Black Holes in Higher Dimensions”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Princeton Gravity Initiative, 4th Floor
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Will Cook, Princeton Gravity Initiative, Princeton University

    Description:  

  • Monday, October 21, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “ZZ Instantons and the Non-Perturbative Dual of c=1 String Theory”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A07
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Bruno Balthazar, Harvard University

    Description: We study the effect of ZZ instantons in c = 1 string theory, and demonstrate that they give rise to non-perturbative corrections to closed string scattering amplitudes that do not saturate unitarity within the closed string sector. Beyond the leading non-perturbative order, logarithmic divergences are canceled between worldsheet diagrams of different topologies, due to the Fischler-Susskind-Polchinski mechanism. These results also allow us to propose the exact non-perturbative matrix model dual of c=1 string theory. 

  • Tuesday, October 22, 2019
    Deep Learning for Physics
    “Talk #1: Machine Learning Techniques for Many-Body Quantum Systems; Talk #2: Autoregressive Simulation of Many-body Quantum Systems”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room 407
    Time: 11:45 AM
    Speaker(s): Giuseppe Carleo, CCQ, Flatiron Institute, Or Sharir, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    Note: Each talk will be preceded with lunch at 11:45 am. The talks will be held from 12:25-1:30 pm. Please check the specific date for room location.

    Description: Registration for each event is free, but required.  Please click on the registration link below for each date, as it becomes available.

    Talk #1: Machine Learning Techniques for Many-Body Quantum SystemsIn this introductory seminar I will cover the main machine learning techniques so-far adopted to study interacting quantum systems. I will first introduce the concept of neural-network quantum states [1], a representation of the many-body wave-function based on artificial neural networks. Theoretical aspects of these representations, including the problem of including symmetries, and their entanglement capacity will be discussed. Then, I will show how neural-network quantum states can be used in a variety of applications. Examples will be given for data-driven, experimental analysis in the context of quantum state tomography [2]. I will also show how these states can be used in variational applications to theoretically study the physical properties of interacting many-body matter, highlighting recent applications to frustrated magnetism [3] and fermionic systems [4].[1] Carleo, and Troyer - Science 355, 602 (2017); [2] Torlai, et al. - Nature Physics 14, 447 (2018); [3] Choo, et al. - arXiv:1903.06713 (2019); [4] Pfau, et al. - arXiv:1909.02487 (2019).

    Talk #2: Autoregressive Simulation of Many-body Quantum SystemsUnderstanding phenomena in systems of many interacting quantum particles, known as quantum many-body systems, is one of the most sought-after objectives in contemporary physics research. The challenge of simulating such systems lies in the extensive resources required for exactly modeling quantum wave-functions, which grows exponentially with the number of particles. Recently, neural networks were demonstrated to be a promising approximation method of quantum wave functions. However, thus far, this approach was mostly focused on more traditional architectures such as Restricted Boltzmann Machines and small fully-connected networks. In this talk, we propose a method for scaling this approach to support large modern architecture. Though significantly more expressive, such architectures do not lend themselves to the conventional methods for employing neural networks for simulating quantum systems. A key part of the simulation is to sample according to the underlying distribution of particle configurations. Current methods rely on Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo sampling, which is too expensive for use with modern architectures, effectively limiting their usable size and capacity. Inspired by recent generative models, we propose a specialized deep convolutional architecture that supports efficient and exact sampling, completely circumventing the need for Markov Chain sampling. We demonstrate our approach can obtain accurate results on larger system sizes than those currently accessible to other neural-network representation of quantum states.
    http://pcts.princeton.edu/programs/current/deep-learning-for-physics-seminar-series/121

  • Tuesday, October 22, 2019
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “Functional Methods and Universal One-Loop Matching in HQET and Beyond”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Marat Freytsis, Rutgers University

    Description: Functional methods, in particular efficient reorganization of the one-loop effective action, have recently made a reappearance in simplifying the problem of computing matching and running effects in Lorentz-invariant effective field theories (EFTs) such as the Standard Model Effective Field Theory. This has lead to the appearance of universal one-loop effective actions, where such effects are now known in closed form for arbitrary field-content. These insights have not yet been brought to bear on modern kinematic EFTs such as heavy quark (HQET) and soft-collinear effective theory despite their greater focus on precision and the inclusion of higher-order effects. I will present some first steps in developing functional one-step matching formulae for EFTs where Lorentz symmetry is broken (or at least obscured) using HQET as my focus but also commenting on more complicated multi-mode EFTs as well.

  • Wednesday, October 23, 2019
    Physics Group Meeting
    “The Geroch Group”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Robert Penna, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

    Description: We review some infinite dimensional symmetries that appear in dimensionally reduced classical general relativity.  Reducing from d=4 to d=2 gives a two dimensional nonlinear sigma model with an infinite dimensional affine Kac-Moody symmetry called the Geroch group. Further reducing to d=1 (along a null Kill vector) enhances the Geroch group to a mysterious "hyperbolic Kac-Moody" symmetry.

    Further reading: 
    [1] P. Breitenlohner and D. Maison, "On the Geroch group," Ann. Inst. H. Poincare, 46, 215 (1987) 
    [2] H. Nicolai, "Two-dimensional gravities and supergravities as integrable systems," in Schladming 1991, Proceedings, Recent aspects of quantum fields, 231, and Hamburg DESY 91-038 
    [3] H. Lu, M. Perry, and C. Pope, ArXiv:0711.0400 and ArXiv:0712.0615

  • Friday, October 25, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “Correlation Functions in AdS3/CFT2”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Lorenz Eberhardt, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

    Description: Recently, an exact AdS3/CFT2 duality was proposed. String theory on AdS3xS3xT4 with one unit of pure NS-NS background flux was conjectured to be dual to the symmetric product orbifold of T4. This is established at the level of the full spectrum of the CFT. In this talk I will report on the matching of sphere correlation functions. This involves crucially the so-called spectrally flowed representations. The moduli space integral of n-point functions for n>3 is argued to localise to a finite sum. I will also discuss the corresponding classical solution of the SL(2,R) WZW model and show that their on-shell action precisely reproduce the correlation functions in the symmetric product orbifold as calculated by path integral methods.

  • Monday, October 28, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Tom Hartman, Cornell University

    Description:  

  • Wednesday, October 30, 2019
    Physics Group Meeting
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Ravindra Bhatt, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS; Princeton University

    Description:  

  • Friday, November 1, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Baurzhan Mukhametzhanov, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

    Description:  

  • Monday, November 4, 2019
    Gravity Initiative Lunch
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Princeton Gravity Initiative, 4th Floor
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Barack Zackay, Institute for Advanced Study

    Description:  

  • Monday, November 4, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “Chaotic and Thermodynamic Properties of two Coupled Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev Models”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Jacobus Verbaarschot, Stony Brook University

    Description: The SYK Model was originally introduced as a random matrix model for the nuclear interaction  that also describes the exponential rise of the spectral density known as  the Bethe formula. Exactly this behavior is the hallmark of the Schwarzian action, the low energy limit of the SYK model, which is the main reason for the excitement this model has brought to the field of Quantum Gravity. Another phenomenon in chaotic many-body quantum systems is the existence of  collective excitations. Remarkably, they are present in the Maldacena-Qi model of two SYK models coupled by a spin-spin interaction, which describes a phase transition between two black holes and a thermal phase. The collective state  is the ground state which is  close to a Thermo-Field Double state. We find that for systems that can be studied numerically,  the wave functions of the ground state show substantial deviations  from the Thermo-Field Double state, which suggests a non-uniform  convergence to this state in the limit of a large number of particles. The main topic of this talk is the discussion of  the thermodynamical and spectral properties of the Maldacena-Qi Model. We find a transition from Poisson  statistics in the tail of the the spectrum to RMT statistics at higher energies, when we separate the Hamiltonian  according to the spin mod 4 symmetry.  We relate this order-chaos transition to the Hawking-Page phase transition.  

  • Tuesday, November 5, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “Born-Infeld Electrodynamics at One-Loop”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A06
    Time: 3:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Callum Jones, University of Michigan

    Description: The Born-Infeld model is an effective field theory of central importance describing the low-energy dynamics of massless gauge bosons on the world-volume of D-branes. Though it is in many ways an exceptional model of nonlinear electrodynamics, several aspects of the physics of the Born-Infeld model remain mysterious. In this talk I will explain how aspects of the model, obscured in the traditional formulation of Lagrangian field theory, are clarified by directly studying the on-shell S-matrix. In particular in 3+1-dimensions, classical Born-Infeld has an electromagnetic duality symmetry which manifests in tree-level scattering amplitudes as the conservation of a chiral charge. Whether this conservation law can be preserved under perturbative quantization is presently unknown. Using modern scattering amplitudes techniques, we have initiated a study of the S-matrix of Born-Infeld at one-loop. I will describe how generalized unitarity together with supersymmetric decomposition can be used to explicitly calculate infinite classes of one-loop amplitudes, and explain how the results are consistent with the existence of a quantum electromagnetic duality.

  • Tuesday, November 5, 2019
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “Co-Decaying Dark Matter and its Cosmological Signatures”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Brandon Melcher, Syracuse University

    Description: This talk will follow the discussions found in https://arxiv.org/abs/1711.04773 and https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.04082. We will discuss the cosmological implications of the Co-Decaying Dark Matter Model--a recently proposed mechanism for depleting the density of dark matter through the decay of nearly degenerate particles. This model generically predicts the existence of an Early Matter Dominated phase of universe evolution. We will show that this phase promotes sub-structure growth and solar mass primordial black holes.

  • Wednesday, November 6, 2019
    Physics Group Meeting
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Baurzhan Mukhametzhanov, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

    Description:  

  • Thursday, November 7, 2019
    Princeton University Gravity Initiative Opening Celebration

    Location: Jadwin Hall, 4th Floor
    Time: 8:30 AM

    Description: Attendance is free, but space is limited, so please register!

     

    Speakers:

    • Sheperd Doeleman
    • Robbert Dijkgraaf
    • Wendy Freedman
    • Gabriela Gonzalez
    • Theodore Jacobson
    • Sergiu Klainerman
    • Nergis Mavalvala
    • Robert Myers
    • Malcolm Perry
    • Andrew Strominger
    • Neil Turok
    • William Unruh

    https://gravity.princeton.edu/events/gravity-initiative-opening-celebration-november-7-8-2019

  • Thursday, November 7, 2019
    Hamilton Colloquium Series
    “The Event Horizon Telescope: Imaging a Black Hole”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A10
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Shep Doeleman, Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

    Description: The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) array operating at the shortest possible wavelengths, which can resolve the event horizons of the nearest supermassive black holes. Observing at mm radio wavelengths enables detection of photons that originate from deep within the gravitational potential well of the black hole, and travel unimpeded to telescopes on the Earth. The primary goal of the EHT is to resolve and image the predicted ring of emission formed by the photon orbit of a black hole and to eventually track dynamics of matter as it orbits close to the event horizon. A sustained program of improvements to VLBI instrumentation and the addition of new sites through an international collaborative effort led to Global observations in April 2017: the first campaign with the potential for horizon imaging. After 1.5 years of data reduction and analysis we report success: we have imaged a black hole. The resulting image is an irregular but clear bright ring, whose size and shape agree closely with the expected lensed photon orbit of a 6.5 billion solar mass black hole. This talk will cover the project and first results as well as future directions for a next-generation instrument that is aimed at real-time black hole video.

  • Thursday, November 7, 2019
    The Gravity Initiative Opening Celebration - Public Lecture
    “Einstein’s Dream — From the Big Bang to Black Holes”

    Location: McDonnell Hall, Room A02
    Time: 8:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Robbert Dijkgraaf, Director, Institute for Advanced Study
    Note: A free lecture open to the public.

    Description: We are living in the golden era of gravitational research, realizing Einsteins vision that by studying the geometry of space and time we can determine the origin, composition, and fate of the Universe. Cutting-edge technology has opened up many new windows in science, from the detection of the remnants of the Big Bang and gravitational waves to the image of a supermassive black hole. Yet, deep questions remain about the dark matter, dark energy, and the nature of quantum space-time.

  • Friday, November 8, 2019
    The Gravity Initiative Opening Celebration

    Location: Jadwin Hall, 4th Floor
    Time: 8:30 AM

    Description: Speakers:
    • Sheperd Doeleman
    • Robbert Dijkgraaf
    • Wendy Freedman
    • Gabriela Gonzalez
    • Theodore Jacobson
    • Sergiu Klainerman
    • Nergis Mavalvala
    • Robert Myers
    • Malcolm Perry
    • Andrew Strominger
    • Neil Turok
    • William Unruh

    https://gravity.princeton.edu/events/gravity-initiative-opening-celebration-november-7-8-2019

  • Monday, November 11, 2019
    Gravity Initiative Lunch
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Princeton Gravity Initiative, 4th Floor
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Christoph Kehle, University of Cambridge

    Description:  

  • Monday, November 11, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Joao Penedones, École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne

    Description:  

  • Monday, November 11, 2019
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Jessie Shelton, University of Ilinois

  • Thursday, November 14, 2019
    Hamilton Colloquium Series
    “Atomic Qubits in Silicon”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A10
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Michelle Simmons, University of New South Wales, Australia

    Description: Phosphorus atoms qubits in silicon have demonstrated extremely long (up to 35 s) coherence times with >99.9% fidelity in the highly manufacturable material silicon. Their small size, combined with the magnetically quiet environment of isotopically pure silicon, make them analogous to ion trap qubits but in a scalable solid-state system. One of the long-term challenges for semiconductor qubits is to understand, and control, the local electromagnetic environment of the qubit down to sub 10nm length scales. Scanning probe techniques, combined with molecular beam epitaxy allow us to engineer fully crystalline devices at the atomic scale and directly probe the qubit wave function with exquisite precision. We will discuss the progress and vision for this approach.

  • Friday, November 15, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Si Li, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS; Tsinghua University

    Description:  

  • Monday, November 18, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TMF and SQFT”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Theo Johnson-Freyd, Perimeter Institute

    Description: I will describe my work, all joint with D. Gaiotto and some also joint with E. Witten, to understand the homotopy type of the space of (1+1)d N=(0,1) SQFTs --- what a condensed matter theorist would call "phases" of SQFTs. Our motivating hypothesis (due in large part to Stolz and Teichner) is that this space models the spectrum called "topological modular forms". Our work includes many nontrivial checks of this hypothesis. First, the hypothesis implies constraints on the possible values of elliptic genera, and suggests (but does not imply) the existence of holomorphic SCFTs saturating these constraints; we have succeeded in constructing such SCFTs in low central charge. Second, the hypothesis implies the existence of torsion-valued "secondary invariants" beyond the elliptic genus that protect SQFTs from admitting deformations that spontaneously break supersymmetry. I will explain such an invariant in terms of holomorphic anomalies and mock modularity.

  • Tuesday, November 19, 2019
    Deep Learning for Physics
    “TBA”

    Location: TBA
    Time: 11:45 AM
    Speaker(s): Kyle Cranmer, New York University, James Halverson, Northeastern University
    Note: Each talk will be preceded with lunch at 11:45 am. The talks will be held from 12:25-1:30 pm. Please check the specific date for room location.

    Description: Registration for each event is free, but required.  Please click on the registration link below for each date, as it becomes available. Register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScD1ZGB17mwhZ3cvyvs8vEqArGJknmcn_udUgL4tJm4DatmUA/viewform
    http://pcts.princeton.edu/programs/current/deep-learning-for-physics-seminar-series/121

  • Tuesday, November 19, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A06
    Time: 3:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Edgar Shaghoulian, Cornell University

    Description:  

  • Tuesday, November 19, 2019
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Jack Setford, Toronto

    Description:  

  • Wednesday, November 20, 2019
    Physics Group Meeting
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Adam Levine, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

    Description:  

  • Thursday, November 21, 2019
    Hamilton Colloquium Series
    “The Revolution of Silicon Photonics”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A10
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Michal Lipson, Columbia University

    Description: We are now experiencing a revolution in optical technologies, where one can print and control massive optical circuits, on a microelectronic chip. This revolution is enabling a whole range of applications that are in need for scalable optical technologies and it is opening the door to areas that only a decade ago were unimaginable.

    In the past decade, the photonic community witnessed a complete transformation of optics. We went from being able to miniaturize a handful of devices to being able to define and control the flow of light using thousands of monolithically integrated optical components all on a silicon chip. The main drive for silicon photonics is the ability to transmit and manipulate ultra high bandwidth with low power dissipation. Today there are hundreds of products being developed and commercialized towards this goal.

    The field of silicon photonics is rapidly evolving and is now enabling completely new applications, ranging from Lidar to biomedical devices. This is partly due to the development of novel chip-scale technologies, novel devices and novel materials compatible with silicon photonics. Many of these technologies and devices can manipulate light across the whole VIS, IR and the Mid IR spectrum. I will discuss these emerging applications, as well as the advancement brought by these novel devices and materials.

    The key challenges of the field relate to the scalability of the systems in bandwidth, size and power. Some of these challenges are fundamental and require innovations that break traditional tradeoffs. Novel approaches for switching, modulating and amplifying light have emerged that can open the door to applications that rely on such scalable systems. I will describe the challenges of the field and some of the recent innovations that can potentially address these challenges.

  • Friday, November 22, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Julian Sonner, University of Geneva

    Description:  

  • Monday, November 25, 2019
    Gravity Initiative Lunch
    “Stability of Black Holes in Classical GR”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Princeton Gravity Initiative, 4th Floor
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Elena Giorgi, Princeton Gravity Initiative, Princeton University

    Description:  

  • Monday, November 25, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Radu Roiban, Pennsylvania State University

    Description:  

  • Tuesday, November 26, 2019
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Jo Dunkley, Princeton University

  • Wednesday, November 27, 2019
    Physics Group Meeting
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA, TBA

  • Monday, December 2, 2019
    Gravity Initiative Lunch
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Princeton Gravity Initiative, 4th Floor
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Elias Most, Flatiron Institute

    Description:  

  • Monday, December 2, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA

    Description:  

  • Tuesday, December 3, 2019
    It from Qubit Conference
    “Workshop on Qubits and Spacetime”

    Location: Wolfensohn Hall
    Time: 6:00 AM

    Description: Please Note: This workshop is not open to the general public, but only to active researchers.

    This workshop will focus on quantum aspects of black holes, focusing on applying ideas from quantum information theory.

    This meeting is sponsored by the "It from Qubit"collaboration and is followed by the collaboration meeting in New York City.
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/quantum-information-workshop-2019

  • Tuesday, December 3, 2019
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Prateek Agrawal, Harvard University

  • Wednesday, December 4, 2019
    It from Qubit Conference
    “Workshop on Qubits and Spacetime”

    Location: Wolfensohn Hall
    Time: 6:00 AM

    Description: Please Note: This workshop is not open to the general public, but only to active researchers.

    This workshop will focus on quantum aspects of black holes, focusing on applying ideas from quantum information theory.

    This meeting is sponsored by the "It from Qubit"collaboration and is followed by the collaboration meeting in New York City.
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/quantum-information-workshop-2019

  • Friday, December 6, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Adam Levine, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

    Description:  

  • Monday, December 9, 2019
    Gravity Initiative Lunch
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Princeton Gravity Initiative, 4th Floor
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Antonios Tsokaros, University of Illinois

    Description:  

  • Tuesday, December 10, 2019
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Simona Murgia, University of California, Irvine

  • Wednesday, December 11, 2019
    Physics Group Meeting
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA, TBA

  • Thursday, December 12, 2019
    Hamilton Colloquium Series
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A10
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Thierry Mora, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris

    Description:  

  • Friday, December 13, 2019
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Nafiz Ishtiaque, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

    Description:  

  • Tuesday, February 11, 2020
    Deep Learning for Physics

    Location: TBA
    Time: 11:45 AM
    Speaker(s): TBA
    Note: Each talk will be preceded with lunch at 11:45 am. The talks will be held from 12:25-1:30 pm. Please check the specific date for room location.

    Description:  

  • Wednesday, March 4, 2020
    Gravity Initiative Workshop
    “The Future of the PLANCK Data”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 8:00 AM

    Description:  

  • Thursday, March 5, 2020
    Gravity Initiative Workshop
    “The Future of the PLANCK Data”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 8:00 AM

    Description:  

  • Friday, March 6, 2020
    Gravity Initiative Workshop
    “The Future of the PLANCK Data”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 8:00 AM

    Description:  

  • Tuesday, March 10, 2020
    Deep Learning for Physics

    Location: TBA
    Time: 11:45 AM
    Speaker(s): TBA
    Note: Each talk will be preceded with lunch at 11:45 am. The talks will be held from 12:25-1:30 pm. Please check the specific date for room location.

    Description:  

  • Tuesday, April 7, 2020
    Deep Learning for Physics

    Location: TBA
    Time: 11:45 AM
    Speaker(s): TBA
    Note: Each talk will be preceded with lunch at 11:45 am. The talks will be held from 12:25-1:30 pm. Please check the specific date for room location.

    Description:  

  • Monday, May 4, 2020
    Gravity Initiative Workshop
    “Exploring Supermassive Black Holes”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 8:00 AM

    Description:  

  • Tuesday, May 5, 2020
    Gravity Initiative Workshop
    “Exploring Supermassive Black Holes”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 8:00 AM

    Description:  

  • Wednesday, May 6, 2020
    Gravity Initiative Workshop
    “Exploring Supermassive Black Holes”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 8:00 AM

    Description:  

  • Monday, July 13, 2020
    PiTP 2020

    Time: 7:00 AM

    Description:  

  • Monday, July 13, 2020
    PiTP 2020

    Time: 7:00 AM

    Description: