Physics Events

  • Wednesday, April 25, 2018
    Physics Group Meeting
    “Discussion on Entanglement Entropy in Gauge Theories”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Jennifer Lin, Member, School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study

  • Thursday, April 26, 2018
    Hamilton Colloquium Series
    “The Matter-antimatter Asymmetry of the Universe and the Search for Neutrinoless Double beta Decay”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A10
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): David Nygren, University of Texas, Arlington

    Description: Why is the universe composed only of matter, with negligible anti-matter? Is the neutrino its own anti-particle? These two seemingly disparate questions may be linked through leptogenesis–a theory which postulates massive neutrinos that break matter-antimatter asymmetry and could yield the universe we observe, inhabit and explore today. Leptogenesis forces today’s neutrinos to be their own anti-particles with non-zero mass in the range of 50 meV, close to the measured value. The only practical avenue for determining the neutrino nature is the search for an almost unimaginably rare nuclear decay–neutrinoless double beta decay, possible in a few isotopes. I focus on NEXT, an experimental program based on 136Xe, in a high-pressure xenon gas Time Projection Chamber that combines excellent energy resolution and rejection of backgrounds through event topology. Strangely, a biochemistry technique might make success possible. Perhaps an exciting discovery awaits, one that may indicate how the universe chose to keep about one part per billion of matter.

  • Friday, April 27, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “Good and Bad Analogies of Physics in Deep Learning”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Guy Gur-Ari, Member, School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study

    Description: To what extent are deep learning models similar to complex physical systems? I will discuss analogies between aspects of deep learning, glassy systems, and Brownian motion. The results may help us to improve second-order optimization algorithms.

  • Monday, April 30, 2018
    PCTS Workshop
    “Statistical Mechanics Out of Equilibrium”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room 407
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Note: FREE, but REQUIRED REGISTRATION is limited and available online at http://pcts.princeton.edu/pcts
    http://wwwphy.princeton.edu/pcts/StatMechanics2018/statmechanics2018.html

  • Monday, April 30, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Lisa Randall, Harvard University

  • Tuesday, May 1, 2018
    PCTS Workshop
    “Statistical Mechanics Out of Equilibrium”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room 407
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Note: FREE, but REQUIRED REGISTRATION is limited and available online at http://pcts.princeton.edu/pcts
    http://wwwphy.princeton.edu/pcts/StatMechanics2018/statmechanics2018.html

  • Tuesday, May 1, 2018
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Brian Henning, Yale University

  • Wednesday, May 2, 2018
    PCTS Workshop
    “Statistical Mechanics Out of Equilibrium”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room 407
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Note: FREE, but REQUIRED REGISTRATION is limited and available online at http://pcts.princeton.edu/pcts
    http://wwwphy.princeton.edu/pcts/StatMechanics2018/statmechanics2018.html

  • Wednesday, May 2, 2018
    Princeton University & PCTS 2018 Distinguished Visiting Lecturer
    “Beyond Space and Time”

    Location: McDonnell Hall, Room A-02
    Time: 8:00 PM
    Speaker(s): David Gross, KITP, University of California, Santa Barbara
    Note: Free and Open to the Public

    Description: I explore the evolving concepts of space and time in physics.

    Today our concepts of spacetime are once again challenged as we struggle to understand quantum gravity, unify the forces of nature, and probe the beginning of the universe.

    I discuss some of the ideas that are currently advanced.

  • Thursday, May 3, 2018
    Hamilton Colloquium Series

    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): David Gross, Chancellor's Chair and Professor of Theoretical Physics at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at UC-Santa Barbara

    Description: The standard model of particle physics is approaching the half-century mark. I shall discuss what we have learned and where we might be headed.

  • Thursday, May 3, 2018
    Hamilton Colloquium Series
    “The Future of Particle Physics”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A10
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): David Gross, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at UC-Santa Barbara

    Description: The standard model of particle physics is approaching the half-century mark. I shall discuss what we have learned and where we might be headed.

  • Monday, May 7, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA, TBA

  • Tuesday, May 8, 2018
    Informal High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Frank Ferrari, Universite Libre de Bruxelles

  • Tuesday, May 8, 2018
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “Testing General Relativity with Gra”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Vitor Cardoso, IST

    Description: Two pivotal breakthroughs in physics recently turned respectable centennials: the discovery of the Schwarzschild solution, describing a non-rotating black hole, and Einstein's prediction of gravitational waves.  Gravitational waves offer a unique glimpse into the unseen universe, and allow us to test the basic tenets of General Relativity, some of which have been taken for granted without observations: are gravitons massless? Are black holes the simplest possible macroscopic objects? do event horizons and black holes really exist, or is their formation halted by some as-yet unknown mechanism? Do singularities arise in our universe as the outcome of violent collisions? Can gravitational waves carry information about the nature of the elusive dark matter?In this talk, I will describe the science encoded in a gravitational wave signal and what the upcoming years might have in store regarding fundamental physics and gravitational waves.

  • Monday, May 14, 2018
    PCTS Workshop
    “Bridging Mathematical Optimization, Information Theory, and Data Science”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room 407
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Note: Registration is closed. The Meeting will be Live Streamed and can be viewed here.
    BridgingMathematicalOptimization,InformationTheory,andDataScience

  • Tuesday, May 15, 2018
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “Outstanding Issues Concerning the Mass Discrepancy”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Stacy McGaugh, Case University

    Description: The missing mass problem has been with us for decades, but laboratory detection of hypothesized dark matter candidates remains elusive. While some lines of evidence seem to absolutely require the existence of some novel form of non-baryonic dark matter (e.g., the cosmic microwave background), others auger against it (e.g., the dynamics of gravitationally bound systems) and suggest the even more radical possibility that it is our understanding of dynamics that remains wanting. I will focus on issues we still don't understand where progress may require new ideas.

  • Wednesday, May 23, 2018
    High Energy Physics Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 2:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Bob Velghe, TRIUMF

  • Saturday, July 14, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Sunday, July 15, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Monday, July 16, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Tuesday, July 17, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Wednesday, July 18, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Thursday, July 19, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Friday, July 20, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Saturday, July 21, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Sunday, July 22, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Monday, July 23, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Tuesday, July 24, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Wednesday, July 25, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Thursday, July 26, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Friday, July 27, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Saturday, July 28, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Sunday, July 29, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM

  • Monday, July 30, 2018
    Prospects in Theoretical Physics

    Time: 5:00 AM