Physics Events

  • Monday, October 15, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “Tree Amplitudes for Some Supersymmetric Theories in Six Dimensions”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): John Schwarz, Caltech

    Description: All of the tree amplitudes are constructed for four supersymmetric theories in six dimensions using spinor-helicity variables and the CHY formalism. Two of the theories, the world volume theories of an M5-brane and a D5-brane, only have nonzero amplitudes when n, the number of particles, is even. The other two theories, (1,1) super Yang-Mills and (2,2) supergravity, have nonzero amplitudes for both even and odd n, of course. The constructions for odd n involve some novel features.

  • Tuesday, October 16, 2018
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “Dynamical Dark Matter: A New Framework for Dark-Matter Physics”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Keith Dienes, University of Arizona

    Description: In this talk, I will provide an introduction to an alternate framework for dark-matter physics which we call "Dynamical Dark Matter" (DDM).  Within this framework, the requirement of dark-matter stability is replaced by a balancing of lifetimes against cosmological abundances across an ensemble of individual dark-matter components with different masses, lifetimes, and abundances.   It is this DDM ensemble which collectively serves as the dark-matter "candidate" within the DDM framework, and which collectively carries the observed dark-matter abundance$ \Omega_{CDM}$.  Likewise, it is the balancing between lifetimes and abundances across the ensemble as a whole which ensures the phenomenological viability of the DDM framework --- indeed, the usual notion of dark-matter stability is no longer required.  As we shall discuss, this leads to a highly dynamical cosmology in which quantities such as $\Omega_{CDM}$ experience non-trivial time-dependences beyond those normally associated with the expansion of the universe.  DDM ensembles arise naturally in many extensions to the Standard Model, including string theory and theories with large extra spacetime dimensions.  Moreover, the DDM framework can lead to many striking signatures at colliders as well as at direct- and indirect-detection dark-matter experiments --- signatures which transcend those usually associated with traditional dark-matter candidates.  In this talk I shall give a theoretical overview of the DDM framework, and survey the research which has been done in this field thus far. Time permitting, I will also discuss the results of two recent projects:  DDM at the Lifetime Frontier, and DDM extended to the thermal domain.

  • Wednesday, October 17, 2018
    Physics Group Meeting
    “Soft Particles and Symmetry”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Daniel Kapec, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

    Description: I will review some of the connections between asymptoticsymmetry groups, soft theorems for scattering amplitudes, and memoryeffects. If time permits I will also discuss special boundary operatorsfor asymptotically flat gravity and their relation to soft theorems.

    Suggested reading:

    [1] A set of comprehensive lecture notes: https://arxiv.org/abs/1703.05448

    [2] Christodoulou's nonlinear memory effect:https://journals.aps.org/prl/pdf/10.1103/PhysRevLett.67.1486

    [3] Thorne's reinterpretation of nonlinear memory:https://journals.aps.org/prd/pdf/10.1103/PhysRevD.45.520

    [4] The BMS group and gravitational memory:https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/JHEP01(2016)086

    [5] Soft theorems and boundary operators: https://arxiv.org/abs/1711.04371

  • Friday, October 19, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA, TBA

  • Monday, October 22, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “Higher algebraic Structures in SUSY QFT”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Tudor Dimofte, University of California, Davis

    Description: In a TQFT of homological type, such as arises from the topological twist of a supersymmetric theory, it is well known that the local operators form an algebra, associative in dimension d >= 1 and commutative in d >= 2. The product comes from collision of operators. I will explain how modern mathematical ideas in TQFT (in particular, the notion of $E_d$ algebras) lead to the existence of a *secondary* product in any dimension d, which acts as a generalized Lie bracket, and has a simple physical definition in terms of topological descent. In d=2, the secondary product is familiar as part of the L-infinity structure of local operators; in d >= 3 it has been relatively unexplored. I will use the secondary product to give a topological interpretation of the physical idea that "Omega background leads to quantization." Time permitting, I will explain some generalizations of the secondary product to line and surface operators, with interesting applications in d=3 and d=4. (Based on joint work with C. Beem, D. Ben-Zvi, M. Bullimore, A. Neitzke.)

  • Tuesday, October 23, 2018
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “Detecting Dark Matter from Supernovae”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Gustavo Markes Tavares, Stanford University

    Description: The central region of Supernovae are one of the hottest and densest regions in the Universe. Due to the high temperatures, particles with sub-GeV masses can be copiously produced if they have non-negligible couplings to the Standard Model. If dark matter has sub-GeV mass it will be produced in the hot Supernovae core and it will have sufficiently large momenta to be detectable in direct detection experiments. In this talk I discuss the sensitivity of current and future Xenon based direct detection experiments to a simplified model of dark matter which interacts with the Standard Model via the dark photon portal.

  • Wednesday, October 24, 2018
    Physics Group Meeting
    “Machine Learning and Applications”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Kyle Cranmer, Junior Visiting Professor, School of Natural Sciences; Professor, University of Maryland

  • Friday, October 26, 2018
    Princeton University Physics Pumpkin Toss 2018

    Location: Jadwin Hall Plaza
    Time: 3:30 PM

    Description: The Department of Physics will host its second annual Physics Pumpkin Toss competition at 3:30 p.m. Friday, October 26, 2018 on the Jadwin Hall Plaza. Teams will compete against each other to launch pumpkins off the roof of Jadwin Hall and aim to hit a target. Faculty members from the department will serve as judges. The winning team will receive a prize.  Join us for this fun event! Wear your Princeton gear, PU colors, or Halloween costume#PrincetonPHYSevents
    https://phy.princeton.edu/events/physics-pumpkin-toss-2018

  • Monday, October 29, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Leonardo Rastelli, Stony Brook University

  • Wednesday, October 31, 2018
    Physics Group Meeting
    “QNEC etc.”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Nima Lashkari, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

  • Friday, November 2, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA, TBA

  • Monday, November 5, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Sergei Dubovsky, New York University

  • Tuesday, November 6, 2018
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Rodolfo Capdevilla, University of Notre Dame

  • Wednesday, November 7, 2018
    Physics Group Meeting
    “Introduction to Integrability”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Shota Komatsu, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

  • Thursday, November 8, 2018
    Princeton University Department of Physics Donald R. Hamilton Colloquium Series
    “Probabilistic Approach to Critical Phenomena in Statistical Physics”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A10
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Hugo Duminil Copin, IHES

    Description: The talk will present some of the recent progress in mathematical studies of critical phenomena of classical statistical mechanical systems. Through the relation of quantum systems to classical systems in d+1 dimensions, some of these new results also yield new understanding of the ground states of a class of quantum spin chains with a projection based Hamiltonian.
    https://phy.princeton.edu/events/donald-r-hamilton-colloquium-series

  • Friday, November 9, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Kiryl Pakorouski, Princeton University

  • Monday, November 12, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Arvin Shahbazi Moghaddam, University of California, Berkeley

  • Tuesday, November 13, 2018
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Liam Fitzpatrick, Boston University

  • Wednesday, November 14, 2018
    Physics Group Meeting
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Edward Witten, Faculty, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

  • Thursday, November 15, 2018
    Princeton University Department of Physics Donald R. Hamilton Colloquium Series
    “Probabilistic Approach to Critical Phenomena in Statistical Physics”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A10
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Hugo Duminil Copin, Institut des Hautes √Čtudes Scientifiques (IHES)

    Description: The talk will present some of the recent progress in mathematical studies of critical phenomena of classical statistical mechanical systems. Through the relation of quantum systems to classical  systems in d+1 dimensions, some of these new results also yield new understanding of the ground states of a class of quantum spin chains with a projection based Hamiltonian. 
    https://phy.princeton.edu/events/donald-r-hamilton-colloquium-series

  • Friday, November 16, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA, TBA

  • Monday, November 19, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Gabor Sarosi, Budapest University of Technology and Economics

  • Wednesday, November 21, 2018
    Physics Group Meeting
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Tom Rudelius, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

  • Monday, November 26, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Daniel Jafferis, Harvard University

  • Tuesday, November 27, 2018
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 12:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Hongwan Li, MIT

  • Tuesday, November 27, 2018
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Hongwan Li, MIT

  • Wednesday, November 28, 2018
    Physics Group Meeting
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Nima Arkani-Hamed, Faculty, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

  • Friday, November 30, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA, TBA

  • Monday, December 3, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA, TBA

  • Tuesday, December 4, 2018
    Qubit Conference

    Time: 6:00 AM

  • Wednesday, December 5, 2018
    Qubit Conference

    Time: 6:00 AM

  • Friday, December 7, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA, TBA

  • Monday, December 10, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Erich Poppitz, University of Toronto

  • Friday, December 14, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA, TBA

  • Monday, January 14, 2019
    PCTS Workshop
    “Novel Ideas for Dark Matter”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Fourth Floor, Room 407, PCTS Seminar Room
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Note: Register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf30X77lY09RVrDcsx98KJJkRoy3akoR5TCQESS101MoT2Y5g/viewform

    Description: Dark matter research is undergoing a paradigm shift. Over the last few years, many novel theories have been proposed that challenge the standard assumptions made about dark matter. At the same time, new observations and simulation results are providing valuable clues regarding the most fruitful directions moving forward.

    The “Novel Ideas for Dark Matter 2019” workshop at Princeton University attempts to bridge the gap between communities working on non-standard solutions to the dark matter problem. Plenary talks on theory, observations and simulations will be structured into a three day schedule that will provide a broad overview of research avenues of this type. The workshop aims to promote conversations between research communities with ample time for open discussion.

    Organizing committee:
    Oren Slone - oslone@princeton.edu
    Mariangela Lisanti - mlistanti@princeton.edu
    Tomer Volansky - tomerv@post.tau.ac.il
    http://pcts.princeton.edu/pcts/current_future_programs.html

  • Tuesday, January 15, 2019
    PCTS Workshop
    “Novel Ideas for Dark Matter”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Fourth Floor, Room 407, PCTS Seminar Room
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Note: Register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf30X77lY09RVrDcsx98KJJkRoy3akoR5TCQESS101MoT2Y5g/viewform

    Description: Dark matter research is undergoing a paradigm shift. Over the last few years, many novel theories have been proposed that challenge the standard assumptions made about dark matter. At the same time, new observations and simulation results are providing valuable clues regarding the most fruitful directions moving forward.

    The “Novel Ideas for Dark Matter 2019” workshop at Princeton University attempts to bridge the gap between communities working on non-standard solutions to the dark matter problem. Plenary talks on theory, observations and simulations will be structured into a three day schedule that will provide a broad overview of research avenues of this type. The workshop aims to promote conversations between research communities with ample time for open discussion.

    Organizing committee:
    Oren Slone - oslone@princeton.edu
    Mariangela Lisanti - mlistanti@princeton.edu
    Tomer Volansky - tomerv@post.tau.ac.il
    http://pcts.princeton.edu/pcts/current_future_programs.html

  • Tuesday, January 15, 2019
    PCTS Workshop
    “Novel Ideas for Dark Matter”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Fourth Floor, Room 407, PCTS Seminar Room
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Note: Register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf30X77lY09RVrDcsx98KJJkRoy3akoR5TCQESS101MoT2Y5g/viewform

    Description: Dark matter research is undergoing a paradigm shift. Over the last few years, many novel theories have been proposed that challenge the standard assumptions made about dark matter. At the same time, new observations and simulation results are providing valuable clues regarding the most fruitful directions moving forward.

    The “Novel Ideas for Dark Matter 2019” workshop at Princeton University attempts to bridge the gap between communities working on non-standard solutions to the dark matter problem. Plenary talks on theory, observations and simulations will be structured into a three day schedule that will provide a broad overview of research avenues of this type. The workshop aims to promote conversations between research communities with ample time for open discussion.

    Organizing committee:
    Oren Slone - oslone@princeton.edu
    Mariangela Lisanti - mlistanti@princeton.edu
    Tomer Volansky - tomerv@post.tau.ac.il
    http://pcts.princeton.edu/pcts/current_future_programs.html